MacOS + Windows 10, Plausible Idea?

joshn17

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Apr 24, 2020
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10.15.1
#1
Hello, I am new to the computer-building world and have been thinking about building a Hackintosh computer.

MacOS is my go-to operating system, but I also like Windows 10 for other uses (i.e. gaming, more easily configurable, better driver support, etc.)
My question is, is it even possible that I could get hardware that would be supported by both MacOS and Windows 10, and get decent performance from both? My main uses for a PC would be audio/video editing (preferably on Mac), 3D Modeling (either OS), gaming (Windows 10), large spreadsheet editing (Preferably Mac), and other "basic" software. Most of my personal computing stuff I would rather do on MacOS. I am hoping to run both OSes on separate hard drives/SSDs, but if they need to be run on the same one that is fine too. Like I said, I'm new to this :D

I'm sure it is possible to build a computer like this, but as a beginner is this going to be too much to tackle? Also, I'm looking at a lower-budget computer (<$2000). Is it even worth trying to build a computer like this?

Comments/ideas are very much welcome, thanks!
 

Edhawk

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#2
Yes, you just need to pick one of Hackintosher's build's and he will have a list of the components you need. Most if not all will cost less than $2,000.

Here is a link to a Golden Build, using an Asus Prime Z390-A motherboard, i9-9600K CPU, high end RX 5700 XT dedicated GPU at its heart - https://hackintosher.com/builds/asus-prime-z390-hackintosh-build-guide-w-rx-5700-xt/

Hackintosher's guide takes you through the full macOS installation for Mojave and/or Catalina. With all the necessary kexts, drivers and SSDT's provided in the downloadable EFI folders.

Installing Windows 10 is simple enough, you just need to remember to install Windows in UEFI mode. If you run windows in its normal mode it will not be accessible from the Clover or OpenCore boot loader. Here is a link to the Rufus USB tool, which will enable you to install the Windows ISO to a USB so it boots and installs the OS in UEFI GPT mode. - http://rufus.ie
 
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RJP1267

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Nov 20, 2020
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10.15.5
#3
I have a similar question, building a Hackintosh that will be just at home running Windows as MacOS. I would like to build a system that can support Big Sur and Windows 10 and be a very good performer in either environment. I have seen some of the parts lists but wanted to make sure they were up to date and that Big Sur is supported. I will be running 2 SSD's 1 for each OS, and possibly running bootcamp or parallels to use windows in a mac session. Thank you.
 

Edhawk

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GA-Z97X-UD5H
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#4
The Builds are OK, if you want a top of the range Big Sur system the you need to look at a Comet Lake build, with a compatible motherboard etc.

The separate SSD dual boot system is fairly standard, there are a number of guides showing how to accomplish this.

If you want to use BootCamp then you have to use OpenCore to boot the system and jump through a few additional hoops to get this working.

Alternatively you could just press the boot option key (F12 on a Gigabyte board) when the system Splash screen shows, to select the Windows Boot Manager or macOS UEFI boot partition.

Parallels is just VM software and should be fine, just check that a new version has been released for Big Sur.
 

Raine

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Gigabyte Z370n WiFi
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Core i5-8400
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#5
I have a similar question, building a Hackintosh that will be just at home running Windows as MacOS. I would like to build a system that can support Big Sur and Windows 10 and be a very good performer in either environment. I have seen some of the parts lists but wanted to make sure they were up to date and that Big Sur is supported. I will be running 2 SSD's 1 for each OS, and possibly running bootcamp or parallels to use windows in a mac session. Thank you.
This is how my current build is set up, as you described. Right now I have MacOS Catalina on my main SSD (daily use) and Windows 10 on a secondary SSD (for some gaming). I use Parallels in MacOS if I need to access Windows within, or I can dual boot natively into Windows 10.

On top of that, I've been running a third "temporary" SSD in the same system (using OpenCore) and a fresh install of Big Sur 11.0.1 for the last 2 weeks so far with no problems whatsoever. On boot I can pick between all 3 OS installs. I say "temporary" because the third SSD was so that I could test Big Sur before committing to it. Now that I know it is compatible with my build and I don't need to change anything else, I will wipe my main SSD and install Big Sur for daily use as soon as some third party apps I use have been updated to be compatible with Big Sur.
 
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RJP1267

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Nov 20, 2020
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10.15.5
#6
Appreciate the feedback. I do not know much about opencore and a Hackintosh is new to me but I have extensive PC experience so this is great info to have. I am putting together a parts list for anticipated black friday cyber monday buying and will post to get input and recommendations. My goal is to have a respectable machine to run Windows and Big Sur but not go overboard on HW so I can divert savings toward my monitor purchase. Example an i7 10th gen vs an i9 Xseries, thats a $200+ savings, I know there is a performance gap but if you have never had a system at those speeds how would you know? Thats my reasoning at the moment.

Q: Are the HW build lists preferences or is there a compatibility consideration? Im guessing the latter, if so, is there a reliable source for a Big Sur Hackintosh HW compatibility list?

Thanks in advance for your help and input.
 

Raine

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#7
Are the HW build lists preferences or is there a compatibility consideration? Im guessing the latter, if so, is there a reliable source for a Big Sur Hackintosh HW compatibility list?
IMO for Clover-based, the build lists you'll see online are only listed online because they got it to work. There are many Clover-based builds available to reference when picking and choosing your own build components. I built my first Hackintosh based on someone else's successful build.

I haven't worked with OpenCore for that long of a time, but the "Hardware Limitations" section in the OpenCore guide goes over what component families can be used so far. You have to know your hardware and know what you're working with. Luckily all of my hardware was compatible with OpenCore, so I had no issues with installing Big Sur.

As for looking for a "reliable source for Big Sur Hackintosh HW compatibility" try the usuals - here, Reddit, etc. and see what other people are using. Although I feel like with the OpenCore guide one could list compatible components on a clean sheet of paper without basing their build on someone else's.

EDIT: Here's a useful resource I just came across: https://dortania.github.io/Anti-Hackintosh-Buyers-Guide/

Like all things Hackintosh, part of it is trial and error. If you're expecting a literal step-by-step guide with exact part numbers and a 100% guarantee your Hackintosh build will work, you won't find that.
 

RJP1267

New member
Joined
Nov 20, 2020
macOS
10.15.5
#8
Yes, you just need to pick one of Hackintosher's build's and he will have a list of the components you need. Most if not all will cost less than $2,000.

Here is a link to a Golden Build, using an Asus Prime Z390-A motherboard, i9-9600K CPU, high end RX 5700 XT dedicated GPU at its heart - https://hackintosher.com/builds/asus-prime-z390-hackintosh-build-guide-w-rx-5700-xt/

Hackintosher's guide takes you through the full macOS installation for Mojave and/or Catalina. With all the necessary kexts, drivers and SSDT's provided in the downloadable EFI folders.

Installing Windows 10 is simple enough, you just need to remember to install Windows in UEFI mode. If you run windows in its normal mode it will not be accessible from the Clover or OpenCore boot loader. Here is a link to the Rufus USB tool, which will enable you to install the Windows ISO to a USB so it boots and installs the OS in UEFI GPT mode. - http://rufus.ie
I am viewing the link to the gold build and you list an i5-9600 processor not the i9-9600 just want to make sure that will still work out. As for the rest of the parts are these still "good to go" for a Win10/Big Sur build? Black Friday is right around the corner and I need to get shopping.

Couple of final pre purchase questions:
1. I have read that PCIe SSD cards get very hot and have melted or worse caught on fire, besides having a case with proper air flow is there anything else to be aware of to prevent a hazard and given alternatives are they the best option? Since I will be running Win10 and Big Sur I intend on having identical SSDs for each.

2. I am on the fence about memory, was originally thinking 32GB but the gold build uses 16GB, any thoughts?

3. I know the video card is a critical part for performance, the price point of $479 is steep, was wondering if there was something out there almost as good but at a lower price point?

4. I like the look of the case but where my machine sits you wont see the glass to the inner workings as it is under my desk against a wall so I will go with a case that supports ATX form factor and has plenty of room for air movement unless you have any other suggestions.

Thank you in advance for your help on this my first build. I hope the experience will allow me to pay it forward. Happy Thanksgiving and Black Friday/Cyber Monday shopping.


Its sad but from what I have been reading this will probably be my 1st and only Hackintosh build as Apple is going to be producing their own CPU, but I hope not.
 

Raine

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#9
I have read that PCIe SSD cards get very hot and have melted or worse caught on fire, besides having a case with proper air flow is there anything else to be aware of to prevent a hazard and given alternatives are they the best option? Since I will be running Win10 and Big Sur I intend on having identical SSDs for each.
That build @Edhawk linked uses NVMe SSds, not PCIe. That said:

- In the past, whole computers have melted or caught on fire.
- In the past, mobile phones have melted or caught on fire.
- In the past, cars have melted or caught on fire.

I bet you still use them though. Don't be paranoid. If you have "extensive PC experience" then this is no different - the only difference with a Hackintosh build is the operating system.

I like the look of the case but where my machine sits you wont see the glass to the inner workings as it is under my desk against a wall so I will go with a case that supports ATX form factor and has plenty of room for air movement unless you have any other suggestions.
Same as above - it's still a computer, regardless of what OS you're installing. Buy a case that suits your needs, you don't have to follow any build 100%, and deviating from it (memory amount, different processor spec) just means you'll have to adjust your system setup.

Bear in mind, before you decide to dive into building a Hackintosh, understand that you will have to "do some work to get it to work". Even if you follow a "Golden Build" exactly as it's laid out, there's still a decent amount of code to type, or settings to set, or parameters to specify. So do yourself a favor and DO NOT OVERTHINK IT. Too many people these days go way overboard overthinking everything trying to get to some "magical" place where they think their project will be 100% fault-free and perfect from day one. If you're one of those people, you should just buy a real Apple Mac. But if you want to take on a project, you can't finish one if you don't even start.

If you want to build a Hackintosh, then build a Hackintosh.
 

RJP1267

New member
Joined
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macOS
10.15.5
#10
That build @Edhawk linked uses NVMe SSds, not PCIe. That said:

- In the past, whole computers have melted or caught on fire.
- In the past, mobile phones have melted or caught on fire.
- In the past, cars have melted or caught on fire.

I bet you still use them though. Don't be paranoid. If you have "extensive PC experience" then this is no different - the only difference with a Hackintosh build is the operating system.



Same as above - it's still a computer, regardless of what OS you're installing. Buy a case that suits your needs, you don't have to follow any build 100%, and deviating from it (memory amount, different processor spec) just means you'll have to adjust your system setup.

Bear in mind, before you decide to dive into building a Hackintosh, understand that you will have to "do some work to get it to work". Even if you follow a "Golden Build" exactly as it's laid out, there's still a decent amount of code to type, or settings to set, or parameters to specify. So do yourself a favor and DO NOT OVERTHINK IT. Too many people these days go way overboard overthinking everything trying to get to some "magical" place where they think their project will be 100% fault-free and perfect from day one. If you're one of those people, you should just buy a real Apple Mac. But if you want to take on a project, you can't finish one if you don't even start.

If you want to build a Hackintosh, then build a Hackintosh.
Thanks for the reply. Although I missed the intent of what appears to be sarcasm in the first part about overheat I have done some additional reading and found that NVMe drives are poorly equipped to handle the temps they run at despite manufacturers knowing the risk and not including proper heat sinks. Given this I am considering the NVMe and building in redundancy by pairing with a SATA SSD or PCIe SSD for backup in a mirrored configuration if possible or as a standard backup drive. I know the speeds between the 2 techs are different but I dont need to write data to the mirror at the same time it is written to the primary as long as the RAID HW has sufficient buffer it will balance out. I take your point about going overboard which is why I inquired about lesser $$ HW. I am using a MAC Pro 2008 (Cheesegrater) with the Catalina hack so if the new processors and graphics and SSDs are as fast as everyone says then I will be very satisfied. As for not running out of the box and tweaks and fixes, that is ok by me, I will not be left without a PC, I just want to eventually get to a steady state and enjoy the experience. And with guidance from gentle souls such as yourself I dont see how anything can go wrong.
 

Raine

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#11
...from gentle souls such as yourself ...
...speaking of sarcasm :unsure: LOL

Thanks for the reply. Although I missed the intent of what appears to be sarcasm in the first part about overheat
Zero intent. Zero sarcasm.
Basically all I was saying there was: "Sometimes, shit just happens." :cool:

I have done some additional reading and found that NVMe drives are poorly equipped to handle the temps they run at despite manufacturers knowing the risk and not including proper heat sinks. Given this I am considering the NVMe and building in redundancy by pairing with a SATA SSD or PCIe SSD for backup in a mirrored configuration if possible or as a standard backup drive. I know the speeds between the 2 techs are different but I dont need to write data to the mirror at the same time it is written to the primary as long as the RAID HW has sufficient buffer it will balance out.
See... overthinking.

It's good you're doing a lot of research on the topic and gathering info, but at some point, you're just going to have to commit to duplicating or basing your build on someone else's build, or for the challenge you can pick your own products and commit to your selections. Hopefully, no issues occur when you get your own machine up and running... but if they do - and only when they do - then you simply have to find solutions.

Whatever you read online (including what you read here), take it all within the context it's presented in. Just because you read someone somewhere else had an NVMe drive fail or have problems, that doesn't mean everyone running NVMe drives are having the same problems or have had the same experiences. An easy example, me: I've been running my primary NVMe drive in a Mini-ITX cube case where it's stuffed next to a dual-slot full-length video card and full-size power supply with just a single 120mm low-rpm case fan, and I've had zero issues with heat for the last 2 years of having my Hackintosh running 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. So it is what it is. (y)
 
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